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Early signs of a Q3 pick-up

The latest data suggest that, following a strong Q2, growth in Emerging Europe as a whole picked up further in Q3. Activity figures from Poland improved in July and August and the early signs are that Turkey’s economy will record very robust growth in Q3, boosted by the comparison with a period last year when activity was disrupted by the coup attempt. Meanwhile, various economic surveys for the region now stand at or around multi-year highs. However, it’s not all good news. In particular, it looks like growth in Russia has softened a little in the last few months. Perhaps the more important point, though, is that Q3 is likely to mark the peak for regional growth. Growth in Turkey is being flattered by temporary factors, while economic cycles in Central Europe are starting to look mature. We expect regional GDP growth to slow in the final quarter of this year and into 2018.
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More from Emerging Europe

Emerging Europe Data Response

Russia Activity Data (May)

The latest Russian data for May suggest that activity, having declined sharply after Western sanctions were imposed in March, has started to stabilise. Some sectors of manufacturing have benefited from a shift towards domestic production. On balance, the fall in Russian GDP this quarter looks like it will be in the order of 10% q/q, not the 15% q/q we had previously expected. EM Drop-In (Thurs, 7th July): Join our economists for their regular monthly briefing on the hot stories in EMs – and those that aren’t getting the attention they deserve. In this 20-minute session, topics will include the outlook for EM FX markets after the recent sell-offs. Register now.

29 June 2022

Emerging Europe Chart Book

Tightening cycles still have some way to go

Inflation has continued to beat expectations across Emerging Europe over the past month, reaching rates not seen in decades in most countries. It is now weighing more heavily on consumer confidence, and the surprise inflation releases for May prompted central banks to accelerate tightening cycles in a number of economies, including Czechia (125bp hike) and Hungary (185bp). Such large hikes are unlikely to be repeated but, with inflation not set to peak for at least a few more months, tightening cycles still have some way to go. The exceptions are Russia and Turkey. Falling inflation will give Russia’s central bank scope to cut its policy rate further and President Erdogan’s grip on Turkey’s central bank means that rate hikes to combat inflation of more than 70% y/y remain off the cards.

29 June 2022

Emerging Europe Data Response

Economic Sentiment Indicators (Jun.)

The EC’s Economic Sentiment Indicators for Central and Eastern Europe showed broad-based declines in sentiment across the region and across sectors in June to levels not seen in a year. Economic activity has generally held up well since the war in Ukraine started a few months ago, but the second half of this year is likely to be more challenging and we think economic recoveries will slow sharply.

29 June 2022

More from Capital Economics Economist

Emerging Europe Economics Update

What should we make of Russia’s data revisions?

The upwards revisions to Russia’s industrial production figures have raised concerns about the quality of the data but, based on the figures released so far, the new series does seem to reflect economic conditions more accurately than the older series.

29 June 2018

Middle East Economics Update

Egypt rates on hold, easing cycle to resume in September

The Egyptian central bank’s decision to leave interest rates on hold (rather than lower rates) was a response to recently-announced subsidy cuts that will push up inflation. But the easing cycle is likely to resume at September’s MPC meeting. And we still think interest rates will, ultimately, be lowered by more than most analysts expect over the next couple of years.

28 June 2018

Energy Focus

Is the sun setting on the oil market?

Slowing economic growth and rapidly rising fuel efficiency, partly due to a surge in the number of electric vehicles, mean that growth in demand for oil will slow and eventually peak over the next twenty years. At the same time, plentiful oil reserves mean that supply should be ample. Indeed, the marginal cost of production is likely to fall as OPEC loses its pricing power and advances in shale technology force more expensive forms of production out of the market. As a result, we expect real oil prices to trend down over the next two decades.

28 June 2018
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