My subscription
...
Filters
My Subscription All Publications

Hope on vaccines, but still a long way to go

COVID-19 vaccine coverage remains pitifully low across much of Sub-Saharan Africa, with less than 10% of populations having received at least a first dose in most countries. But there are signs that things may be slowly turning a corner. The rate of vaccination has picked up in recent weeks and there are growing hopes that this trend will continue as the supply of vaccines to the continent improves. That said, there is still a long way to go to reach the high vaccine coverage achieved in other parts of the world. What’s more, even as supply improves, other hurdles such as logistical challenges and vaccine hesitancy may still hinder progress. In the meantime, the region will remain vulnerable to fresh virus outbreaks and the threat of tighter restrictions will continue to cast a cloud over the economic outlook.
Continue reading

More from Africa

Africa Data Response

Nigeria GDP (Q1)

Nigeria’s GDP growth slowed to 3.1% y/y in Q1 as robust growth in the non-oil sector was more than offset by a slump in the oil sector. Looser fiscal policy ahead of elections in early 2023 will provide some support to activity going forward, but continued weakness in oil production and disruptions caused by draconian FX policies underpin our below-consensus forecast for growth of 2.3% over 2022 as a whole.

23 May 2022

Africa Economics Weekly

Markets and monetary policy, mounting pressure on naira

Recent investor risk-off sentiment has pushed up sovereign dollar bond yields across Sub-Saharan Africa, fuelling debt risks further, and has put currencies under pressure. Central banks appear to be taking note, with some policymakers turning tightening cycles up a notch. In Nigeria, the recent weakness of the currency on the black market was attributed to election-related spending, but the bigger issue is that downward pressure on the naira stems from the central bank’s unorthodox FX policies.

20 May 2022

Africa Economics Update

Hawks’ majority in SARB to be short-lived

Policymakers in South Africa upped the pace of tightening today, raising the repo rate by 50bp to 4.75%, as concerns about inflation (and inflation expectations in particular) have grown. We don’t think that the hawks will have their way for long though as the tightening cycle is likely to revert to a more gradual pace from the second half of this year.

19 May 2022

More from Africa Economics Team

Africa Economic Outlook

Headwinds beyond vaccine woes intensifying

Extremely low vaccine coverage continues to cast a dark cloud over recovery prospects in Sub-Saharan Africa and this will be compounded by deteriorations in the terms of trade and tighter fiscal policy. As a result, rebounds in most economies will lag behind other EMs. Sovereign debt risks look acute in Ethiopia and are growing in Ghana, while South Africa faces a slow-burning problem.

27 October 2021

Africa Chart Book

Contrasting currency tales

Currencies of the two biggest economies in Africa have had contrasting fortunes recently, with Nigeria’s official naira exchange rate recently devalued but the South African rand soaring on the back of higher metals prices. Nigerian policymakers have taken a step in the right direction but, while we expect further falls in the naira, the authorities will stop short of the unified and fairly valued exchange rate than many are hoping for. Meanwhile, the star performance of the rand is unlikely to last as we expect most commodity prices to fall back, and that US long-term yields will begin to rise again, putting renewed pressure on EM currencies. In addition, we think the SARB will not tighten policy as quickly as investors now discount, and that concerns about South Africa’s fiscal situation will eventually resurface.

27 May 2021

Africa Chart Book

Recoveries lifted by the commodity high… for now

The sharp rises in copper and iron ore prices this month will have given a much-needed boost to African producers such as Zambia and South Africa. Gold also traded higher in April compared to March, supporting recoveries in the likes of Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda. And while the rebound in oil prices stalled a bit this month, Brent crude has risen a long way from last year’s trough. Balance sheet strains in the region’s key oil producers Nigeria and Angola are probably easing already. Nonetheless, we expect that metals prices will begin to fall back later this year, and oil in 2022, removing this prop to the recovery.

29 April 2021
↑ Back to top