Turkey’s crisis just one of many threats to EM assets

The main factor weighing on EM assets recently has been worries about contagion from the crisis in Turkey. But even if these fears subside, there are plenty of other reasons to be pessimistic about the outlook.
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Global Markets Outlook

We don’t expect the rally in bond markets to continue

While long-dated government bond yields have plummeted in recent months, we suspect that high inflation and the prospect of tighter monetary policy will see them turn a corner before long. We forecast long-term yields to rise across most major economies, especially in the US, where inflationary pressures look particularly strong. Higher yields may also help limit the upside for risky assets, such as equities and corporate bonds. Their valuations already appear fairly stretched in many cases. And when it comes to equities, an extremely strong rebound in corporate earnings already appears to be discounted. As a result, we forecast only small gains in equities across both DMs and EMs, and expect credit spreads to narrow only a little, if at all, from here.

30 July 2021

Global Markets Update

We doubt global saving will stop US yields from rising

In the early 2000s, a ‘glut’ of global saving may have helped restrain rises in long-term US bond yields, even as investors began to discount tighter monetary policy. We don’t think that similar factors explain the latest fall in yields, nor do we expect them to prevent yields from rising over the next couple of years.

28 July 2021

Global Markets Update

We expect E-Z “peripheral” spreads to remain low

While we no longer expect peripheral spreads to narrow this year, we still think that they will remain close to their current levels, which are close to the lowest since the Global Financial Crisis.

23 July 2021

More from Capital Economics Economist

Japan Economics Weekly

Post-Olympics public spending boost, BoJ holding firm

Japan’s government appears to be lining up a stimulus programme to prevent an economic downturn after the Tokyo Olympics next year. While increased public spending would provide a welcome boost to GDP, we don’t believe there’s any particular reason to expect a post-Olympics slowdown. Meanwhile, the Bank of Japan is bucking the global trend towards additional monetary easing. Unlike some commentators, we don’t think that loosening by other major central banks puts the Bank of Japan’s policy framework under pressure.

21 June 2019

Emerging Markets Economics Chart Book

EM growth running at a three-year low

EM GDP growth slowed to just 3.3% y/y in Q1, its weakest pace since the first half of 2016, and our Tracker suggests that it remained sluggish in Q2. Growth should pick up a little in the second half of the year. Large commodity producers, such as Brazil, Russia and South Africa, are likely to find their feet again after a terrible performance in Q1. And Turkey and Argentina should recover from the downturns caused by last year’s currency crises. But growth will remain weak and, in most cases, our 2019 and 2020 GDP growth forecasts are below consensus.

21 June 2019

Emerging Asia Economics Weekly

Growth continues to weaken, rates to be cut further

After a very weak first quarter that saw GDP growth in many countries drop to a post-financial crisis low, the most recent data suggest growth across Emerging Asia has continued to slow. Weak growth is likely to prompt further interest rate cuts over the coming months across the region. Despite leaving rates unchanged on Thursday, we expect the central banks of the Philippines and Indonesia to loosen monetary policy at their next meetings.

21 June 2019
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