PMIs imply that goods shortages are pushing up prices

The global manufacturing PMI held broadly steady in May as a sharp drop in India’s survey was offset by rises in other major economies whose recoveries appear to be continuing unabated. Meanwhile, goods shortages are exerting upward pressure on prices, and there are some signs that they are also weighing on output, particularly in the euro-zone.
Gabriella Dickens Assistant Economist
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