Withdrawal of affordability test is a wise move
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Withdrawal of affordability test is a wise move

We suspect that the main reason for the hasty withdrawal of the Financial Policy Committee’s mortgage affordability test is that it was on course to become a severe constraint on many buyers’ financial firepower. If left in place, it could have led to a far larger house price fall than the 5% drop we forecast.
Andrew Wishart Senior Property Economist
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