My subscription
...
Filters
My Subscription All Publications

S&P Global/CIPS Flash PMIs (May)

The flash PMI survey for May suggests that economic growth has slowed to a crawl and that the risk of a recession has not gone away. Even so, weakness in the economy doesn’t seem to be filtering into an easing of price pressures. As a result, we think that interest rates still have much further to rise, from 1.00% now to 3.00% in 2023. ECB Drop-In (24th May 10:00 ET/15:00 BST): Could the ECB deliver a hawkish surprise? Join economists from our Europe and Markets teams for a discussion about what to expect from the Bank’s tightening cycle, including the chances for a bumper hike in July or even an early move at next month’s meeting. Register now.
Nicholas Farr Assistant Economist
Continue reading

More from UK

UK Economics Weekly

Fall in confidence not enough to rule out aggressive rate hikes

Signs that business confidence has started to ease may provide the Monetary Policy Committee with some reassurance that firms' pricing power will soon soften. But the danger that bigger increases in wages will further add to businesses' costs, forcing them to raise their prices by even more, suggests that the Bank may need stronger proof that pricing power is waning before ruling out the need for more aggressive rate rises. We expect interest rates to rise from 1.25% to 3.00%. And for as long as evidence of increased pricing power exists, the risk of even higher rates will linger.

1 July 2022

UK Data Response

Money & Credit (May)

The more muted rise in unsecured borrowing in May suggests the cost of living crisis and recent plunge in consumer confidence are prompting households to exercise a bit more caution. That adds to reasons to think consumer spending is struggling and that the economy will be very weak over the coming months.

1 July 2022

UK Data Response

GDP (Q1 Final)

The final Q1 GDP data leave households looking a bit more vulnerable to the big fall in real incomes that’s going to hit in Q2 and Q3. Although GDP and consumer spending won’t fall as far as real incomes, it’s pretty clear that the economy is going to be very weak for a while. A recession is a real risk.

30 June 2022

More from Nicholas Farr

UK Data Response

Retail Sales (Apr.)

The unexpectedly strong rise in retail sales in April suggests the cost of living crisis hasn’t caused consumer spending to collapse and means the economy may have a little more momentum than we previously thought. It also supports our view that a weaker economy on its own won’t solve the issue of sky-high inflation and that the Bank of England will have to raise interest rates further from 1.00% to 3.00%. ECB Drop-In (24th May 10:00 ET/15:00 BST): Could the ECB deliver a hawkish surprise? Join economists from our Europe and Markets teams for a discussion about what to expect from the Bank’s tightening cycle, including the chances for a bumper hike in July or even an early move at next month’s meeting. Register now.

20 May 2022

UK Economics Update

Weak confidence doesn’t make spending crash inevitable

The recent collapse in consumer confidence to a near-record low has added to the probability that the UK experiences a recession this year. But households’ large stock of savings and the tightness in the labour market means that weak confidence may not weigh on consumer spending as much as in the past.

19 May 2022

UK Data Response

S&P Global/CIPS Flash PMIs (Apr.)

The fall in the composite PMI in April suggests GDP growth has continued to slow as the cost of living crisis has intensified. But economic activity doesn’t appear to be collapsing. And, beneath the headline numbers, the survey suggested price pressures remain elevated. As such, we think the Bank of England will raise interest rates  again, from 0.75% to 1.00%, at its next meeting on 5th May. 

22 April 2022
↑ Back to top