Tunisia fiscal policy, Egypt’s private sector, COVID-19

Tunisia’s government upwardly revised its 2021 budget deficit target this week which, coupled with growing signs of it making concessions to appease the UGTT labour union, adds to our view that the public finances will continue to deteriorate and a debt restructuring will be needed. Elsewhere, Egypt government announced plans to scale back its involvement in the economy. While encouraging, there are reasons to be sceptical. And finally, COVID-19 vaccine rollouts in parts of North Africa have picked up the pace and the news of the development of an antiviral pill will provide countries with a further tool to add to the arsenal.
James Swanston Middle East and North Africa Economist
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