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Emerging Markets Capital Flows Monitor (Nov.)

Our tracker suggests that capital flows into and out of the EM world were essentially balanced last month. Over 2017 as a whole, outflows will be about US$55bn, just an eighth of the total recorded in 2016.
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More from Emerging Markets

Emerging Markets Economics Update

Emerging Markets Capital Flows Monitor

Capital outflows from EMs have eased over the past month, helping to stabilise local asset prices. But we think outflows will pick up again before long. That’s a threat to those EMs whose current account deficits have widened or are widening sharply, including Turkey, Chile and parts of Central Europe. Emerging Europe Drop-In (11th Aug): We’re expecting downturns in Central and Eastern Europe, but how bad could it get? Join this 20-minute briefing on our Q3 Outlook report, including the latest on Turkey, Russia and whether Hungary’s forint has further to fall. Register now.

10 August 2022

Emerging Markets Economics Update

End of the EM tightening cycle creeping closer

While DM central banks are currently raising interest rates in earnest, the past week has brought signs that tightening cycles are now nearing an end in parts of the emerging world. Indeed, with interest rates now well above neutral in much of Emerging Europe and Latin America, policymakers in most countries in these regions will probably ease off the brakes by October. Within Asia, low inflation has allowed policymakers to start tightening later and cycles will end later too, with rates at much lower levels.

8 August 2022

Frontier Markets Monthly Wrap

Five questions and answers on frontier default risks

The spreads of sovereign dollar bonds over US Treasuries are in distressed territory in almost a third of EMs covered in the JP Morgan EMBI Index, with the majority of those being frontier markets. In this note, we answer five key questions on default risks in frontier markets. EM Drop-In (4th August, 10:00 ET/15:00 BST): Join our monthly online session on the big issues in emerging markets. In this 20-minute briefing, the team will be answering your questions about debt risks amid global tightening, the latest on the inflation outlook and much more. Register now. ​

3 August 2022

More from Capital Economics Economist

US Economics Weekly

Stronger growth not generating major imbalances

After the Fed’s decision to raise interest rates by another 25bp, Fed Chair Jerome Powell claimed in the post-meeting press conference that “the economy is doing very well” – we couldn’t agree more. That view was bolstered by May’s retail sales figures, which suggested that both consumption and GDP growth will rebound strongly in the second quarter, to above 4% annualised. The Fed’s financial account data, released last Friday, illustrate that the economic expansion is not being accompanied by a sharp rise in private sector debt. Rising household wealth is prompting households to save less of their incomes and firms have plenty of resources to fund investment, not least thanks to the 2017 tax reform. The main vulnerability is a renewed surge in Federal debt, but even that wasn’t as bad as it looked, because it was boosted by the suspension of the debt ceiling and partly matched by a rise in assets held in the Treasury account at the Fed.

15 June 2018

Commodities Weekly Wrap

Fears of protectionism weigh on prices

The Fed’s decision to hike its target rate by 25bp and the announcement that the US was going to press ahead with a 25% tariff on imports of Chinese goods prompted a rally in the dollar, which in turn weighed on commodity prices. China has already said it will retaliate, notably with a 25% tariff on soybeans, which was a key factor in the 4% slump in their price this week. Softer Chinese activity data for May, released on Thursday, also worried investors, particularly in the industrial metals markets.

15 June 2018

Canada Economics Weekly

Household debt will remain a risk for years to come

The news earlier this week that household debt had edged down to 168.0% of disposable incomes in the first quarter, from 169.7% in the final quarter of last year, was greeted by some as confirmation that the Bank of Canada had somehow engineered a soft landing in the housing market. It hasn’t. Debt usually surges in the fourth quarter ahead of the Holiday season and falls back in the first quarter, as people pay down their credit cards. Moreover, by focusing on debt exclusively, those commentators also conveniently failed to note that overall household net worth declined to a two-year low of 857% of disposable income.

15 June 2018
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