Turkey: how strong is the fiscal picture?

Turkey’s public finances have become more vulnerable to falls in the currency in recent years, although we think the likelihood of sovereign default is very low. Perhaps the bigger risk for the public finances is that the pressure on the central bank to focus on growth is matched by a shift to a looser fiscal stance, causing the debt dynamics to worsen.
William Jackson Chief Emerging Markets Economist
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Emerging Europe Data Response

Poland Activity Data (Dec.)

The latest activity data in Poland show that industry expanded strongly in Q4 but that the shine came off the retail sector amid falling consumer sentiment and surging inflation. We think that GDP expanded by around 6.8% y/y (1.1% q/q) in Q4 which would leave Poland as the best performing economy in the region, but that the recovery will slow a touch at the start of this year.

24 January 2022

Emerging Europe Economics Weekly

Ukrainian markets feel the heat, oil nearing $90pb

Ukraine's financial markets remained under pressure this week as investors appear to have priced in a more serious outcome regarding Russia-Ukraine tensions. A positive reaction to today's talks between the US and Russia has brought some relief but, even if a renewed conflict doesn't materialise, local markets are set to face a difficult few months. Meanwhile, oil prices closed in on $90pb this week and we've revised up our year-end Brent crude forecast to $70pb (from $60pb). This will help support Russia's budget and current account surpluses, but will add 0.2-0.3%-pts to inflation elsewhere in the region and cause current account balances to worsen.

21 January 2022

Emerging Europe Economic Outlook

Mounting headwinds to take the shine off the recovery

We expect regional GDP growth to come in below expectations this year as high inflation erodes households’ real incomes and policy becomes more restrictive. Despite this view on the growth outlook, we think that persistent capacity constraints will mean that inflation ultimately settles at a higher level than is currently appreciated. This feeds into our relatively hawkish interest rate forecasts, particularly in Russia, Poland and Czechia.

20 January 2022

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Latin America Data Response

Brazil IPCA-15 (Nov. 2021)

The Brazilian inflation reading of 10.7% y/y in mid-November (the same as the October full month figure) provides the first sign that inflation is now stabilising. But with the headline rate still far above target and fiscal risks persisting, it looks more likely than not that Copom will raise the Selic rate in a larger 175bp step (to 9.50%) when it meets next month.

25 November 2021

Emerging Markets Economics Chart Book

EM tightening cycles have further to run

Inflation in the emerging world has generally surprised to the upside in recent months. But while inflation in most parts of Asia remains at levels which central banks are comfortable with, it has risen well above target in much of Emerging Europe and Latin America. Soaring energy (and in some countries food) prices explain a big chunk of the rise in headline rates, although the re-opening of economies and goods shortages have caused core price pressures to intensify too. This has prompted central banks to step on the brakes and raise interest rates, with policymakers in Brazil, Chile and Czechia in particular stepping up the pace of tightening over the past few weeks. Looking ahead, with inflation across both Latin America and Emerging Europe set to remain above central bank targets for a while yet, further rate hikes lie in store. The key exception is Turkey where, under pressure from President Erdogan, the central bank has signalled that it will ease policy again at its next meeting.

19 November 2021

Latin America Economics Update

Higher rates quickly adding to Brazil’s fiscal challenge

By next year, Brazil’s public sector interest payments could be almost twice as large (at ~8% of GDP) as they were in 2020, making the challenge of stabilising the public debt-to-GDP ratio all the more difficult.

15 November 2021
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