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MPC starts to signal rate hikes

The Monetary Policy Committee’s (MPC) policy statement sent a clear signal that higher interest rates are on the horizon. But there were few signs that it is preparing to hike rates soon. What’s more, we continue to envisage inflation dropping back more sharply next year than the Bank expects. As a result, we remain comfortable with our view that policy won’t be tightened for two years yet.
Ruth Gregory Senior UK Economist
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UK Data Response

S&P Global/CIPS Flash PMIs (May)

The flash PMI survey for May suggests that economic growth has slowed to a crawl and that the risk of a recession has not gone away. Even so, weakness in the economy doesn’t seem to be filtering into an easing of price pressures. As a result, we think that interest rates still have much further to rise, from 1.00% now to 3.00% in 2023. ECB Drop-In (24th May 10:00 ET/15:00 BST): Could the ECB deliver a hawkish surprise? Join economists from our Europe and Markets teams for a discussion about what to expect from the Bank’s tightening cycle, including the chances for a bumper hike in July or even an early move at next month’s meeting. Register now.

24 May 2022

UK Data Response

Public Finances (Apr.)

The economic wind that has recently been blowing the public finances to undershoot forecasts adds more pressure on the Chancellor to launch in the coming weeks a big package of measures to help households cope with the cost of living crisis. But as the economic wind is already showing signs of becoming less favourable for the public finances, we think the support package is more likely to be small and targeted. ECB Drop-In (24th May 10:00 ET/15:00 BST): Could the ECB deliver a hawkish surprise? Join economists from our Europe and Markets teams for a discussion about what to expect from the Bank’s tightening cycle, including the chances for a bumper hike in July or even an early move at next month’s meeting. Register now.

24 May 2022

UK Economics Weekly

Inflation to rise further and linger longer than in the US and EZ

Not only did the surge in CPI inflation to 9.0% in April leave inflation in the UK above the rates in both the US and the euro-zone, but inflation in the UK will probably rise further and stay higher for longer. That feeds into our forecast that the Bank of England will have to raise rates further than it expects, from 1.00% now to 3.00%. ECB Drop-In (24th May 10:00 ET/15:00 BST): Could the ECB deliver a hawkish surprise? Join economists from our Europe and Markets teams for a discussion about what to expect from the Bank’s tightening cycle, including the chances for a bumper hike in July or even an early move at next month’s meeting. Register now.

20 May 2022

More from Ruth Gregory

UK Economics Weekly

At risk of stalling, but Q3 may make up for Q2’s weakness

This week brought further signs that the “pingdemic” weighed on economic activity and evidence that in June, consumers amassed excess savings at a faster rate than in May. As a result, there’s clearly a risk Q2 GDP growth will be weaker than we previously thought. However, with the “pingdemic” likely to ease over the next month, COVID-19 case numbers falling and our CE Mobility Tracker and new electronic card payments ticking up, we are sticking with our forecast that GDP will return to its pre-virus peak in October. Even so, it’s clear that any further big gains in activity may have to wait until August.

30 July 2021

MPC Watch

Divisions emerge, but early end to BoE’s asset purchases unlikely

While the Bank of England will upgrade its near-term forecasts for inflation in its Monetary Policy Report (MPR) published on 5th August, it will probably still judge that the rise is transitory. And while Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) member Michael Saunders may break ranks to vote in favour of an early end to the Bank’s net asset purchases, we do not think others will join him in signalling that interest rate hikes are drawing closer.

29 July 2021

UK Data Response

Public Finances (Jun.)

June’s public finances figures provided further evidence that the strong economic recovery is feeding through into lower government borrowing. So despite rising debt service costs, we still think that the economy can do more of the job in “fixing” the public finances than a fiscal tightening.

21 July 2021
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