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Revisiting Turkey’s external vulnerabilities

The Turkish lira has held up relatively well amid the coronavirus-related sell-off in EM currencies, but the country’s large external debts leave it vulnerable if external financing conditions continue to tighten. A sharper sell-off in the currency would limit the scope for further interest rate cuts.
Jason Tuvey Senior Emerging Markets Economist
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