The outlook for deglobalisation

We argued some time ago that globalisation had peaked and a period of deglobalisation might even lie ahead. It is now becoming clearer what to expect – namely a type of regionalism driven by the emergence of separate US-led and China-led spheres. While this decoupling began with trade, it will increasingly spread into technology, market access and financial ties. This will put a modest dent in productivity growth at a global level, but China stands to come off worse than the West given its inefficient state-led model.
Vicky Redwood Senior Economic Adviser
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