Globalisation will stall in the wake of COVID-19

Global supply chains have functioned well this year despite the disruption of social distancing and lockdowns, and people in many places appear more appreciative of migrants. But the pandemic is widening the rift between China and the rest of the world. It will come to be seen as the moment when decoupling became irreversible and the recent wave of globalisation began to retreat.
Mark Williams Chief Asia Economist
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