EM manufacturing stays weak in early Q3

The manufacturing PMIs for July suggests that growth in EM industry remained soft at the start of Q3, with activity in Emerging Europe weakening sharply. The surveys also provide further evidence that price pressures are easing, supporting our view that central banks will continue to loosen policy.
William Jackson Chief Emerging Markets Economist
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Emerging Markets Activity Monitor

EM recoveries enter a more difficult phase

Persistent supply shortages, fading reopening boosts and tighter financial conditions all pose headwinds to recoveries in Emerging Europe and Latin America over the coming quarters, while cooling construction activity looks set to weigh on growth in China. By contrast, the near-term outlook has brightened in South East Asia as economies emerge from lockdowns.

25 November 2021

Emerging Markets Economics Update

Headwinds build as financial conditions tighten

The sharp tightening of financial conditions in Latin America and Emerging Europe will add to headwinds facing both regions and feeds into our view that recoveries there are entering a slower phase. Financial conditions in Asia have tightened too, albeit to a much smaller extent. And with most central banks in the region in no rush to raise interest rates, conditions there will probably stay loose for some time yet.

24 November 2021

Emerging Markets Economics Chart Book

EM tightening cycles have further to run

Inflation in the emerging world has generally surprised to the upside in recent months. But while inflation in most parts of Asia remains at levels which central banks are comfortable with, it has risen well above target in much of Emerging Europe and Latin America. Soaring energy (and in some countries food) prices explain a big chunk of the rise in headline rates, although the re-opening of economies and goods shortages have caused core price pressures to intensify too. This has prompted central banks to step on the brakes and raise interest rates, with policymakers in Brazil, Chile and Czechia in particular stepping up the pace of tightening over the past few weeks. Looking ahead, with inflation across both Latin America and Emerging Europe set to remain above central bank targets for a while yet, further rate hikes lie in store. The key exception is Turkey where, under pressure from President Erdogan, the central bank has signalled that it will ease policy again at its next meeting.

19 November 2021

More from William Jackson

Latin America Economics Weekly

Peru turmoil, Chile’s lockdown, hawks & doves

Pedro Castillo’s victory in Peru’s presidential election caused local markets to tumble, but if his more moderate post-election comments are borne out in policymaking, asset prices are likely to recover some lost ground. In Chile, while the latest lockdown has caused the near-term outlook to worsen, we retain a positive view on the economy’s growth prospects. The central bank’s forecasts published this week show that it is of a similar opinion (and that rates will rise this year as a result – in line with our projections). Elsewhere, the news that Mexico’s finance minister will take over as central bank governor next year adds weight to our view that Banxico bank will tolerate higher inflation.

11 June 2021

Latin America Data Response

Mexico Industrial Production (Apr.)

The surprise drop in Mexican industrial production in April may partly be payback for a strong March. And early indicators suggest that industrial activity picked up in May. Moreover, with services sectors recovering, we continue to think that the economy will grow by an above-consensus 6.5% this year.

11 June 2021

Emerging Europe Data Response

Turkey Industrial Production & Retail Sales (Apr.)

The m/m falls in Turkish industrial production and retail sales in April are likely to be followed by further weakness in May (when a three-week lockdown was in place). This supports our view that the economy will probably contract in q/q terms over Q2 as a whole. We suspect that the central bank will leave interest rates unchanged when it meets next week, but the softer economic activity figures will add to demands for rate cuts, which seem likely to come in July.

11 June 2021
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