The impact of China’s trade restrictions on Australia

We estimate that the exports of goods and services that are already facing restrictions by China contribute around 1.8% to Australia’s GDP. While we still expect iron ore and liquefied natural gas exports to remain spared, that figure could rise to around 2.8% of GDP if China targeted other products for which it isn’t hugely dependent on Australian imports. While Australia should be able to divert some shipments to other countries, the escalating trade war is another reason why Australia’s economy will never return to its pre-virus path even once the pandemic has been brought under control.
Marcel Thieliant Senior Japan, Australia & New Zealand Economist
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