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‘Transitory’ inflation claims look less convincing

The further jump in CPI inflation in May was again driven by a handful of categories most affected by the lifting of pandemic restrictions. But there were also clear signs that inflationary pressures are becoming more widespread, with rent of shelter inflation in the early stages of a cyclical rebound and the jump in food away from home prices a sign that severe labour shortages, and the resulting upward pressure on wages, are starting to feed through. Those trends are much less likely to be transitory, particularly when inflation expectations have continued to trend higher. With the economy still a long way from the Fed’s full employment goal we doubt that officials will be in any rush to bring forward plans for tightening policy. But we suspect the Fed will eventually be forced to admit that higher core inflation will prove more persistent they initially believed.
Paul Ashworth Chief North America Economist
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US Economics Weekly

Spender of last resort

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US Chart Book

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US Data Response

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More from Paul Ashworth

US Economics Weekly

Fed officials split; Biden backs infrastructure deal

Fed Chair Jerome Powell stuck to the script in his congressional appearance earlier this week, arguing it was “very, very, unlikely” that the US would experience a return to the high inflation of the 1970s. Elsewhere, President Joe Biden gave his support to a bipartisan infrastructure deal worth $1trn then promptly threatened to veto it too.

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US Economics Weekly

Democrats’ spending plans hit by reality check

The Senate Parliamentarian delivered some bad news to the Democrats this week – ruling that they could introduce another reconciliation to the current budget, which would allow them to pass more of President Joe Biden’s spending plans measures with a filibuster-proof simple majority. But she also ruled that any new reconciliation would first have to be approved by the Senate Budget Committee and, since that is split evenly 11-11, the Democrats are left in the hopeless position of trying to convince one of those 11 Republicans to switch sides.

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US Data Response

Employment Report (May)

The 559,000 gain in non-farm payrolls in May was at least an improvement on the 278,000 gain in April but, with the level of employment still 7.6 million below its pre-pandemic peak, it would take more than 12 months at that pace to fully eradicate the shortfall. Only a few months ago we had expected to see several months' worth of gains north of one million, as the economy reopened, but labour supply is bouncing back much more slowly than demand.

4 June 2021
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