Can the virus be contained with little economic pain?

Some countries have managed to control the new coronavirus without large-scale quarantines or economic shutdowns. But they have achieved this by preventing the virus from spreading within the community in the first place. The only places that have so far succeeded in containing outbreaks once the virus has spread, China and Korea, have done so at the cost of severe economic dislocation.
Mark Williams Chief Asia Economist
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