Surge in participation rate nearing its end
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Surge in participation rate nearing its end

The surge in the participation rate that has boosted employment by nearly a tenth since 2012 and thereby underpinned stronger economic growth is running out of steam. This will have a big impact, shaving close to a percentage point off Japan’s sustainable rate of GDP growth over the next few years.
Marcel Thieliant Senior Japan, Australia & New Zealand Economist
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