G7 tax deal encouraging sign for cooperation among DMs

The direct implications of this weekend’s deal on global corporate taxation struck by G7 finance ministers will be limited. But the deal suggests that wealthy nations have found renewed determination under a Biden presidency to cooperate on global issues, which may pay dividends in other areas in years to come.
Simon MacAdam Senior Global Economist
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Global Economics Update

Global PMIs flattening off at high levels

The main takeaway from today’s batch of manufacturing PMIs is that industrial output growth looks to have peaked. Output indices have generally stopped rising, and new orders indices have come off the boil. Even so, with supply unable to keep up with demand, price pressures show little sign of abating.

2 August 2021

Global Economic Outlook

Pandemic rebound peaks but recovery story still intact

The initial post-pandemic resurgence is nearing its zenith, but strong policy support and limited private sector debt should allow most economies to grow at a healthy pace over the next two years. The US and China were among the fastest to recover to their pre-virus paths or even beyond, so it is no surprise that they are slowing first, whereas growth in the euro-zone and Japan has yet to peak. The spreading Delta variant is a risk, but mainly to Emerging Markets where vaccination is less advanced. As goods shortages ease, activity normalises, and commodity prices fall, most economies should see inflation drop back towards central bank targets and policy tightening will generally be more limited or come later than markets expect. Even in the US, where inflation is a bigger threat, we do not expect interest rate hikes until the first half of 2023.

28 July 2021

Global Trade Monitor

World trade recovery levelling off

Real world goods trade edged down in May, suggesting that the recovery has levelled off. True, this slight fall comes after an impressive rebound since May last year, global trade remains well above its pre-virus level, and trade data are usually volatile. Nonetheless, the timely evidence indicates that May’s outturn was not a blip and was instead the beginning of a period of normalisation in the pace of trade growth.

26 July 2021

More from Simon MacAdam

Global Trade Monitor

Recovery in world trade continues, for now

April’s data revealed that world trade flows have enjoyed virtually interrupted growth for 12 months now, with world trade remaining well above its pre-virus level. But between the quintupling of shipping costs over the past year, supply disruptions, and a potential cooldown in the demand for traded goods as economies re-open, there is no shortage of impediments to a continued robust recovery.

25 June 2021

Global Economics Update

Reflationary recovery races on

Inflation indicators in the flash PMIs for June reached new record highs and supplier delivery times lengthened still further. However, outside the US at least, there are few signs that goods shortages and higher costs have held back the recovery in manufacturing output. More generally, the PMIs suggest that lockdown easing continues to propel recoveries in the US and Europe, where restrictions have eased.

23 June 2021

Global Economics Update

How much of the rise in inflation is due to ‘base effects’?

Much of the rise in inflation in major advanced economies from February to May has reflected the fact that prices fell in the same period a year ago. That said, depending on how you measure it, around half of the jump in inflation in the US and UK over the past three months has reflected a ‘genuine’ pick-up in For the most part, base effects are unlikely to be a significant driver of inflation in the year ahead.

18 June 2021
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