Stronger growth based on shaky foundations

We are gradually getting a clearer idea of how GDP growth in the third quarter shaped up. And so far, it is looking like it will be a pretty good number. But we doubt that the recent improvement will last. Indeed, a number of temporary factors have boosted activity and there is little sign that the fundamental drivers of growth have improved much. Overall, we have not changed our view that GDP growth this year as a whole will come in at 1.3% – the slowest annual rate since the crisis.
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UK Data Response

Labour Market (Nov./Dec.)

The labour market appears to have tightened after the end of the furlough scheme and at the start of the Omicron wave. So even though real wages are now falling and will decline further, we still expect the Bank of England to raise interest rates from 0.25% to 0.50% on 3rd February and to 1.25% by December.

18 January 2022

UK Economic Outlook

More inflation, more interest rate hikes

Although the hit to households’ real incomes from a bigger surge in CPI inflation than most expect (to a peak of almost 7% in April) explains why we think GDP growth will be slower this year than the consensus forecast, we still think that the leap in inflation will prompt the Bank of England to raise interest rates further this year than most economists anticipate, from 0.25% to 1.25%. The risks are that the labour market remains stronger for longer, CPI inflation stays above the 2% target well into next year and the Bank of England raises interest rates further in 2023.

17 January 2022

UK Economics Weekly

Ramifications could be bigger if PM stays than if he goes

The growing uncertainty over the Prime Minister Boris Johnson's position is unlikely to dent economic activity. Arguably, though, if a leadership challenge is avoided or Boris Johnson wins it, the medium-term political and economic ramifications could be bigger than if he steps down. Even so, we doubt recent political events will transform the economic outlook this year, which is one of inflation rising to a peak of 7% causing the economy to be weaker than most expect and the Bank of England to raise interest rates from 0.25% now to 1.25%.

14 January 2022

More from Capital Economics Economist

Emerging Markets Economics Update

EM easing cycles not all to do with the Fed

Financial markets have come round rapidly in the last few weeks to our view that EM monetary policy will be loosened further this year. But EM loosening cycles have much more to do with weak domestic growth and low inflation than the prospect of interest rate cuts in the US.

20 June 2019

European Economics Focus

Cyprus to outperform euro-zone, but risks remain

Cyprus has now recovered from the economic crisis of 2012-13, which was caused primarily by its oversized banking sector. While a number of risks remain, notably the high level of non-performing loans, we expect the economy to continue expanding more rapidly than the euro-zone as a whole for the next few years, and the public debt ratio to fall steadily.

20 June 2019

Emerging Europe Data Response

Russia Activity Data (May)

May’s activity data suggest that, following extremely weak GDP growth in Q1, Russia’s economy has failed to gather much momentum in Q2.

20 June 2019
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