Money & Credit (Jun.)

The money and credit data showed that consumers were willing to take on more debt in June. However, with consumers accumulating excess savings at a faster pace, there were signs that the resurgence in virus cases may have triggered some consumer caution, which could weigh on the recovery.
Kieran Tompkins Assistant Economist
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UK Economics Weekly

Why we changed our mind on the BoE

There were two key reasons behind our decision to forecast that the Bank of England will first raise interest rates in 2022 rather than in 2023. First, there is more evidence that the rise in inflation is feeding into faster underlying wage growth and higher inflation expectations. Second, the Bank’s reaction function appears to have changed as it seems less willing to look through a temporary rise in inflation. That said, we still think that the Bank will raise interest rates a little later than the February 2022 date priced into the market and to a lower level by the end of 2024 than investors expect.

24 September 2021

UK Economics Update

MPC getting closer to tightening policy

While rates were left at +0.10% in an 9-0 vote and the Bank of England’s target stock of purchased assets at £895bn, today’s Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) policy statement suggests that the Bank is moving closer to raising interest rates. As such, we now think that rates could rise in early 2022, rather than in 2023 as we had previously thought.

23 September 2021

UK Data Response

IHS Markit/CIPS Flash PMIs (Sep.)

The small fall in the composite activity PMI in September indicates that the economy lost a little more momentum. But at the same time, there were clear signs that price pressures have continued to pick up. While it is difficult to know which the Bank of England will choose to put more weight on, our view is that the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) won’t rush to raise interest rates.

23 September 2021

More from Kieran Tompkins

UK Data Response

IHS Markit/CIPS Flash PMIs (Jul.)

The second consecutive decline in the flash composite PMI in July came as no surprise to us as we expected the pace of the economic recovery to naturally slow after the big gains following the reopening of retail and hospitality. But there are also some signs that product and labour shortages are starting to restrain activity.

23 July 2021

UK Economics Focus

Most labour shortages will probably be temporary

The widely reported labour shortages should mostly prove temporary. While it may take 6-12 months before some of the underlying causes unwind, recruitment difficulties probably won’t have a long-lasting upward impact on wage growth. As such, they shouldn’t persistently lift CPI inflation.

8 July 2021

UK Data Response

IHS Markit/CIPS Flash PMIs (Jun.)

The fall in the flash composite PMI from a record high of 62.9 in May to 61.7 in June indicates that the pace of the recovery may have peaked. That suggests the monthly rises in GDP will ease back from the 2.3% m/m gain recorded in April. Nonetheless, the level of GDP will continue to climb towards and beyond pre-pandemic levels.

23 June 2021
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