Post-Olympics public spending boost, BoJ holding firm

Post-Olympics public spending boost, BoJ holding firm

Japan’s government appears to be lining up a stimulus programme to prevent an economic downturn after the Tokyo Olympics next year. While increased public spending would provide a welcome boost to GDP, we don’t believe there’s any particular reason to expect a post-Olympics slowdown. Meanwhile, the Bank of Japan is bucking the global trend towards additional monetary easing. Unlike some commentators, we don’t think that loosening by other major central banks puts the Bank of Japan’s policy framework under pressure.
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Japan Economics Update

What would a hard lockdown mean for Japan?

With the Delta variant lifting new infections to a record-high, calls for a “hard” lockdown are growing. If that happened, services activity would fall further but we doubt that the government would shut down industry. And with households and firms now better prepared to deal with virus restrictions, it seems likely that GDP wouldn’t revisit last year’s lows.  

2 August 2021

Japan Economics Weekly

Another disappointing quarter

Strong activity data for June confirm that the economy entered Q3 on a relatively strong footing. But while vaccinations are limiting the number of severe cases and deaths, daily coronavirus cases have surged beyond previous peaks in the Greater Tokyo area this week. That’s prompted the government to expand Tokyo’s state of emergency declaration to the surrounding prefectures and Osaka. As such, the recovery in consumer spending will probably be knocked back yet again in August. We’re revising down our Q3 forecasts and pushing more of the rebound into Q4 and 2022.

30 July 2021

Japan Data Response

Labour Market, Ind. Production & Retail Sales (Jun. 21)

Retail sales, industrial production and employment all rebounded strongly in June, pointing to a sizeable recovery in activity in between the Alpha- and Delta-driven coronavirus waves. That supports our view that the economy just about avoided a contraction in Q2 and entered Q3 on a stronger footing.

30 July 2021

More from Capital Economics Economist

Emerging Markets Economics Chart Book

EM growth running at a three-year low

EM GDP growth slowed to just 3.3% y/y in Q1, its weakest pace since the first half of 2016, and our Tracker suggests that it remained sluggish in Q2. Growth should pick up a little in the second half of the year. Large commodity producers, such as Brazil, Russia and South Africa, are likely to find their feet again after a terrible performance in Q1. And Turkey and Argentina should recover from the downturns caused by last year’s currency crises. But growth will remain weak and, in most cases, our 2019 and 2020 GDP growth forecasts are below consensus.

21 June 2019

Emerging Asia Economics Weekly

Growth continues to weaken, rates to be cut further

After a very weak first quarter that saw GDP growth in many countries drop to a post-financial crisis low, the most recent data suggest growth across Emerging Asia has continued to slow. Weak growth is likely to prompt further interest rate cuts over the coming months across the region. Despite leaving rates unchanged on Thursday, we expect the central banks of the Philippines and Indonesia to loosen monetary policy at their next meetings.

21 June 2019

China Economics Weekly

Baoshang reverberations, WTO defeat

In a Focus last month, we discussed what we see as the most plausible hard landing scenario for China: troubles at a small bank that spread to the interbank market and trigger a systemic banking crisis. There are disconcerting similarities in the strains that have followed the regulatory takeover of Baoshang Bank. These have intensified in the past week, taking credit spreads for low-rated banks to record levels. This may not be the Big One but recent events underline that a banking crisis is a significant medium-term risk. Meanwhile, China conceded defeat this week in a key case at the WTO. It will be hoping for a better outcome from talks between Presidents Xi and Trump at the upcoming G20.

21 June 2019
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