My subscription
...
Filters
My Subscription All Publications

Quietly doubling down on Made in China 2025

The 14th Five-Year Plan makes clear that self-sufficiency has grown as a priority for China’s leadership. But it is light on specifics. The details will probably be fleshed out in the raft of industry-level plans that usually follow its publication. But in the meantime, the best guide to policymakers’ ambitions comes from a widely-overlooked source, the “Made in China 2025” Key Technology Roadmap. This controversial document – full of explicit targets for market share– was quietly updated late last year, expanding the number of sectors and adding new goals for 2030.
Julian Evans-Pritchard Senior China Economist
Continue reading

More from China

China Data Response

China Activity & Spending (Jul.)

The July data suggest that the post-lockdown recovery lost steam as the one-off boost from reopening fizzled out and mortgage boycotts triggered a renewed deterioration in the property sector. We think the outlook will remain challenging in the coming months as exports turn from tailwind to headwind, the property downturn deepens, and virus disruptions remain a recurring drag. Asia Drop-In (25th Aug.): What’s the economic impact of a weak yen? What does the latest China-Taiwan flare-up mean for decoupling? How ugly are conditions in China’s real estate sector? Join economists from across our Asia services for this regular briefing on the region’s big investment stories. Register now.

15 August 2022

China Economics Update

Surprise rate cut amid economic woes

The People’s Bank (PBOC) has cut its policy rates in response to a loss of economic momentum. A cut to the Loan Prime Rate (LPR) later this month is now a given and we expect additional easing measures further ahead, though it’s far from clear that this will be sufficient to drive a revival in credit growth.

15 August 2022

China Economics Weekly

PBOC turns less dovish on inflation

The PBOC’s latest monetary policy report struck a less dovish tone, warning that inflationary pressure may increase in the near-term. We think these concerns are overdone and that inflation is more likely to drop back over the rest of the year. But for now at least, the PBOC appears to see inflation risks as yet another reason to maintain its restrained approach to stimulus.

12 August 2022

More from Julian Evans-Pritchard

Long Run Update

Employment already declining at pace

Revisions to the historic data following the recent census show that China’s population barely grew last year and that employment is already contracting faster than previously understood, having peaked in 2014 rather than 2017. The silver-lining, however, is that the new data suggest that productivity growth has slowed by less and that there is greater scope to counter demographic headwinds by boosting participation rates over the coming decades.

1 July 2021

China Data Response

China Caixin Manufacturing PMI (Jun.)

The Caixin manufacturing index published today dropped back last month and adds to signs from the official PMI released yesterday that momentum in industry is waning. The surveys point to a levelling off in demand and easing of price pressures, even as supply shortages continue to constrain output.

1 July 2021

China Chart Book

No, China isn’t exporting inflation

Some believe that China is adding to global inflationary pressure. The opposite is closer to the truth: the large increase in China’s trade surplus over the past year signals that supply from China has risen far more than demand. Global consumer goods prices are rising in spite of China, not because of it. Admittedly, China’s rapid, investment-intensive recovery has been an important factor in the rise in global commodity prices over the past year – this is the key reason why China’s producer price inflation hit a 12-year high last month. But China’s contribution to the surge in global demand for consumer durables has been relatively small – unlike in many major economies, retail spending on goods in China is not particularly strong. And while dollar prices of goods from China have risen over the past year, these price hikes have generally failed to keep up with the pace of renminbi appreciation. In renminbi terms, export prices have been falling unusually fast.

30 June 2021
↑ Back to top