Brazil Industrial Production (Oct.)

The surprise 0.6% m/m fall in Brazilian industrial production in October and weakness in the surveys for last month provide early evidence that the contraction in the economy last quarter may be followed by another q/q drop in GDP in Q4.
William Jackson Chief Emerging Markets Economist
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There have been some recent clues that Brazil’s former left-wing president Lula, the current favourite to win October’s election, may not be as radical as some fear. But there is still a clear risk that he would backslide on key economic reforms. Otherwise, the encouraging recoveries in auto production in Brazil and Mexico tallies with broader evidence that global goods shortages began to ease towards the end of 2021. Unfortunately, the recent surge in Omicron cases globally risks putting a spanner in the works as supply chains may face renewed disruption.

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Argentina & the IMF: deal or no deal?

Although the Argentine government and the IMF do not fully see eye-to-eye, there have been signs of progress in negotiations and we think it’s most likely that they will sign a fresh agreement within the next few months. That would probably give some relief to bondholders in the near term. But we remain sceptical that a new IMF deal would be enough to fix Argentina’s economic issues over the coming years. Drop-In: Neil Shearing will host an online panel of our senior economists to answer your questions and update on macro and markets this Thursday, 13th January (11:00 ET/16:00 GMT). Register for the latest on everything from Omicron to the Fed to our key calls for 2022. Registration here.  

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Latin America Data Response

Mexico Industrial Production (Nov.)

The disappointing 0.1% m/m fall in Mexican industrial production in November raises the chances that the economy slipped into a recession last quarter. And while auto production looks to have rebounded strongly in December, the supply disruptions may continue to keep industry weak in Q1.

11 January 2022

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Latin America Data Response

Brazil GDP (Q3 2021)

The 0.1% q/q fall in Brazilian GDP in Q3 confirmed that problems in the agricultural and industrial sectors tipped the economy into a technical recession. And with financial conditions tightening, the terms of trade worsening, and the threat from the new Omicron variant, the risks to our GDP growth forecast for next year of 1.3% are skewed firmly to the downside. Copom may temper its hawkish sentiment a bit at its meeting next week, with a 150bp hike (rather than 175bp) now looking more likely.

2 December 2021

Middle East Chart Book

MENA and the Omicron risks

The Middle East and North African economies are potentially among the most vulnerable to the fallout from the Omicron strain of COVID-19. The North African economies as well as Lebanon and Jordan have low vaccination rates and large tourism sectors, leaving them exposed to the risk of tighter restrictions and curbs on international travel. In the Gulf, vaccination rates are much higher and, Dubai aside, tourism sectors are relatively small. But the fall in energy prices could prompt governments to hold off loosening fiscal policy. And producers may raise oil output more slowly, which would weigh on economic growth.

30 November 2021

Emerging Markets Economics Update

The Omicron variant and the threat to EMs

There’s a lot that we don’t know about the new Omicron variant. But if it proves more virulent, the economic fallout would probably be largest in EMs in parts of Africa and South and South East Asia that have lower vaccination rates, more limited fiscal space and/or larger tourism sectors. The new variant may also temper the pace of tightening cycles in parts of the emerging world. In view of the wider interest, we are also sending this Emerging Markets Economics Update to clients of all our Emerging Markets services.

29 November 2021
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