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Lasting blow to supply capacity is not inevitable

It is by no means inevitable that the coronavirus crisis puts a big permanent hole in the supply capacity of economies (i.e. their ability to produce goods and services). With the right government policies, many economies should be able more or less to revert to the path of output they were on before the crisis. Nonetheless, with demand likely to be slow to recover fully, this could still take several years. And there will be several important exceptions to this generally optimistic picture.
Vicky Redwood Senior Economic Adviser
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Global Economics Update

Is a recession necessary to bring down inflation?

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More from Vicky Redwood

Global Economics Update

Is the rise in house prices becoming a concern?

It is an under-statement to say that house prices have weathered the pandemic well; housing markets are positively booming. Yet the drivers of this rise in prices are rather different to those of the pre-2007 housing boom, meaning that we do not seem to be heading for a repeat of the housing-driven financial crisis of 2007/08. Nonetheless, there are pockets of concern, and we would get more worried if it looked like interest rates were about to rise sharply.

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CE Spotlight

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14 July 2021
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