What steps will Biden take to tackle climate change?

President-elect Joe Biden stood for election on a far-reaching environmental plan which, although it will be harder to implement with the Republicans likely to control the Senate, still represents a dramatic U-turn from President Donald Trump’s term in office. Even without congressional support, Biden will be able to tighten vehicle fuel economy standards, set more ambitious targets for reducing carbon emissions from power plants, and encourage individual states to implement their own measures. The net impact on the economy will, at worst, be slightly negative and, if it boosts investment and accelerates innovation, could even turn out to be positive.
Paul Ashworth Chief North America Economist
Continue reading

More from US

US Chart Book

Omicron impact short-lived

The surge in Omicron infections means more people were self-isolating in early-January than at any time since the beginning of the pandemic, although the impact that will have on employment and output remains uncertain. Furthermore, with cases now falling just as quickly as they rose, any effects will be quickly reversed in February. In contrast to earlier waves, the rise in infections hasn’t prompted as big a pullback in services activity, with fears of catching the virus lower than during previous waves. The far bigger factor this time is staff absenteeism, which we think will cause both payroll employment and manufacturing output to decline in January, although the impact should be mostly reversed by the end of the first quarter.

24 January 2022

US Economics Weekly

Omicron reaches plateau, leaving Fed free to hike

We expect the Fed to deliver some heavy hints at next week’s FOMC that it is planning an interest rate hike in March. With the Omicron wave now past its peak nationally, there is little to hold the Fed back, particularly if next week brings news of a further acceleration in wage growth.

21 January 2022

US Economic Outlook

Inflation to remain elevated as GDP growth slows

We expect underlying inflation to remain well above the 2% target this year, which means the Fed will push ahead with four rate hikes even though real GDP growth is likely to disappoint. Core inflation will average 4.3% in 2022 and close to 3.0% in 2023. GDP growth will slow to 2.7% this year and 2.0% in 2023.

20 January 2022

More from Paul Ashworth

US Economics Update

Inflation “transitory”, but Fed now projects rate hikes

The Fed continued to stick to its view that the surge in inflation "largely" reflects "transitory factors", but officials revised their inflation projections up significantly for this year and the median projection now shows two 25bp interest rate hikes in 2023. In his press conference, Chair Jerome Powell argued that the Fed was still “a ways off” from achieving the substantial further progress toward its dual mandate goals that would trigger a tapering of its monthly asset purchases.

16 June 2021

US Data Response

GDP (Q1)

Buoyed by the two rounds of stimulus cheques sent out in the first three months of the year, first-quarter GDP growth accelerated to 6.4% annualised, driven by a massive 10.7% surge in consumption. That left the level of GDP less than 1% off its pre-pandemic peak. It will recapture that level in the second quarter and, with the pace of growth we expect, any remaining output gap should be eliminated before the end of this year.

29 April 2021

US Economics Update

Fed remains dovish despite strength of recovery

Although it took a more upbeat tone on the economic outlook and acknowledged that inflation has risen in its statement released after today’s FOMC meeting, the Fed offered no hints that it was considering slowing the pace of its asset purchases, let alone thinking about raising interest rates.

28 April 2021
↑ Back to top