My subscription
...
Filters
My Subscription All Publications

Australia - Government yet to deliver pre-election spending boost

The government unveiled only modest increases in spending in today’s fiscal update. And while the unemployment rate has now reached levels where the Treasurer has pledged to start repairing the public finances, the government’s priority remains to support the economy amidst continued virus uncertainty. The upshot is that a genuine spending boost will still happen ahead of federal elections in May.  
Marcel Thieliant Senior Japan, Australia & New Zealand Economist
Continue reading

More from Australia & New Zealand

Australia & New Zealand Chart Book

Consumption to surge even as real incomes fall

We now expect Australia’s inflation to rise by more than 6% this year. Even allowing for an acceleration in earnings growth and a further solid rise in employment as immigration resumes, that will result in the first annual fall in real household disposable income since the early 1990s. By contrast, we expect gains in nominal disposable income to continue to stay ahead of increases in consumer prices in New Zealand. Even so, we expect Australia’s real consumption growth to outpace New Zealand’s this year, for two key reasons. First, consumer spending in Australia has only just started to surpass its pre-virus peak but is already well above that watermark in New Zealand. Accordingly, there’s more scope for catch-up in Australia. Second, consumer confidence in Australia has softened but has collapsed in New Zealand, where it reached an all-time low in March. We’ve pencilled in a 6% rise in Australia’s consumption this year, well above our forecast of a 2.8% rise in New Zealand. ANZ Drop-in (18th May, 07:00 BST/14:00 SGT): Join economists from our Australia and Markets services shortly after the release of Q1 labour market data for a discussion about the Australian growth, inflation and monetary policy outlook. Register now.

17 May 2022

Australia & New Zealand Economics Weekly

Minimum wage to rise by 4% this year

Suggestions by Labor leader Albanese that minimum wage increases in line with inflation plus productivity growth are sustainable are wide of the mark at a time when consumer prices are rising twice as fast as the RBA would like them to. But with even employers supporting a large minimum wage hike, we now expect the Fair Work Commission to lift the minimum wage by 4% next month. While that would reduce the hit to household incomes from soaring living costs, it would add to the upward pressure on inflation. ANZ Drop-in (19th May, 07:00 BST/14:00 SGT): Join economists from our Australia and Markets services shortly after the release of Q1 labour market data on 18th May for a discussion about the Australian growth, inflation and monetary policy outlook. Register now.

13 May 2022

Australia & New Zealand Economics Update

New Zealand - Wage growth will rise further before it falls

The 6% rise in the minimum wage will help lift wage growth further this year. But a loosening labour market and smaller minimum wage hikes in the years ahead will facilitate a slow down in wage growth from next year. Markets Drop-In (11th May, 10:00 EDT/15:00 BST): We’re discussing our Q2 Outlook reports and what they say about the potential performance of bonds, equities and FX rates as inflation peaks in a special 20-minute briefing on Wednesday. Register now.

11 May 2022

More from Marcel Thieliant

Japan Economics Update

BoJ won’t join hawkish shift by other central banks

While central banks elsewhere are becoming increasingly hawkish, the Bank of Japan kept policy loose today and is set to remain among the most dovish central banks for the foreseeable future.

17 December 2021

Australia & New Zealand Data Response

Australia Labour Market (Nov.)

The remarkable recovery in Australia’s labour market following the recent lockdowns suggests that the Reserve Bank of Australia will end its asset purchases altogether in February.   Note: Central Bank Drop-In – The Fed, ECB and BoE are just some of the key central bank decisions expected in this packed week of meetings. Neil Shearing and a special panel of our chief economists will sift through the outcomes on Thursday, 16th December at 11:00 ET/16:00 GMT and discuss the monetary policy outlook for 2022.

16 December 2021

Japan Data Response

Tankan (Q4 2021)

The Q4 Tankan survey showed that the services sector has started to narrow the gap relative to manufacturing and we think that process has further to run.

13 December 2021
↑ Back to top