Qatar gas, Morocco FX purchases, Tunisian turmoil

The continued rise in global gas prices will provide a substantial boost to Qatar's export revenues and provide scope for policymakers to loosen the purse strings to support the economic recovery. Elsewhere, moves by Morocco’s central bank suggest that the currency could appreciate further. Finally, Tunisia’s President Kais Saied's moves on Wednesday add to signs that his power grab is leading to a one-man rule. This will reinforce concerns about the future of Tunisia’s democracy and the government’s capacity to service its debts.
James Swanston Middle East and North Africa Economist
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