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Turkey: lessons from previous easing cycles

Past experience suggests that, with inflation near a peak and the economy slowing (alongside pressure from President Erdogan for lower interest rates), Turkey’s central bank will push ahead and ease monetary conditions in the coming months.
Nicholas Farr Assistant Economist
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