Egypt’s IMF talks, Saudi stocks drop, Tunisia elections

Reports that Egypt and the IMF are in negotiations over some kind of future cooperation suggests that the authorities are trying to soothe investor fears of fiscal loosening. But the absence of financing means that the government would not be under pressure to meet IMF fiscal targets and structural reforms are unlikely to be pushed through. Meanwhile, as we had warned would happen, the Saudi stock market has now erased all of its gains this year. And the outcome of Tunisia’s election mean that there will be few efforts to tackle the country’s large imbalances in the coming months.
Jason Tuvey Senior Emerging Markets Economist
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Middle East Economics Weekly

Omicron, tourism and the oil market

Low vaccine coverage and large tourism sectors mean that the non-Gulf economies are particularly vulnerable to the emergence of the Omicron variant. Meanwhile, the drop in oil prices and the likelihood that OPEC+ raises oil output more slowly than previously envisaged has increased the downside risks to our GDP growth forecasts for the Gulf.

2 December 2021

Middle East Economics Update

Saudi economy set for a strong end to the year

The economic recovery in Saudi Arabia has picked up pace and should end the year on a strong note. The emergence of the Omicron variant has clouded the outlook, but for now we expect economic growth in the Kingdom to strengthen in 2022 on the back of rising oil output.

2 December 2021

Middle East Chart Book

MENA and the Omicron risks

The Middle East and North African economies are potentially among the most vulnerable to the fallout from the Omicron strain of COVID-19. The North African economies as well as Lebanon and Jordan have low vaccination rates and large tourism sectors, leaving them exposed to the risk of tighter restrictions and curbs on international travel. In the Gulf, vaccination rates are much higher and, Dubai aside, tourism sectors are relatively small. But the fall in energy prices could prompt governments to hold off loosening fiscal policy. And producers may raise oil output more slowly, which would weigh on economic growth.

30 November 2021

More from Jason Tuvey

Emerging Europe Economics Weekly

Lira touches new low, CEE bond yield divergence

It's been a rocky week for the Turkish lira amid more changes at the central bank and political upheaval regarding a possible link between politicians and organised crime. This, coming alongside high inflation, has reduced the chances of an interest rate cut at the next meeting in June. Meanwhile, local currency bond yields have diverged in Central Europe recently, but we don't think this will continue and see scope for further rises in yields over the coming years, particularly in Czechia.

28 May 2021

Africa Economics Update

Nigeria’s recovery to remain stuck in first gear

The pick-up in Nigeria’s GDP growth in Q1 was driven in large part by the oil sector and rising oil output will support a further acceleration in growth over the coming quarters. But FX restrictions, limited fiscal support and a very slow vaccine rollout mean that the recovery is likely to remain stuck in the slow lane.

24 May 2021

Africa Data Response

South Africa Consumer Prices (Apr.)

The jump in South Africa’s headline inflation in April, to 4.4% y/y, was driven by energy price effects but there were signs that broader price pressures are starting to build. But even so, we think that the Reserve Bank will keep rates on hold for longer than investors currently expect in order to support the economy.

19 May 2021
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