GDP still likely to shrink this year

The economy appears to have weathered October’s sales tax hike better than many had feared. But with industrial production set to record the steepest quarterly fall since the Great East Japan Earthquake and global growth likely to disappoint, we still expect Japan’s GDP to shrink this year.
Marcel Thieliant Senior Japan, Australia & New Zealand Economist
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Japan Economics Weekly

Government seeks to revive soggy chip industry

The breakdown of PM Kishida’s new supplementary budget released today showed that ¥600 billion has been allocated to reviving semiconductor manufacturing in Japan. The centrepiece of the plan is a new TSMC factory in Kumamoto Prefecture that will produce the mid-range chips critical for car production. Given recent supply disruptions caused by chip shortages, beefing up local production makes strategic sense. We think the government’s new interventionist approach to stimulating mid-range chip production may succeed, but plans to make inroads into high-range chip production are likely to fall flat.

26 November 2021

Japan Data Response

Japan Flash PMIs (Nov. 2021)

November’s flash PMI points to a rebound in industrial output amidst early signs that supply shortages are diminishing. But while the services sector is now on the mend, the recovery there is lacking vigour.

24 November 2021

Japan Economics Update

Bank of Japan not losing control of money market

Media reports that suggest that the Bank of Japan is losing control of short-term interest rates due to its “Special Deposit Facility” encouraging banks to park reserves at the BoJ are wide of the mark. The scheme does not threaten the viability of the BoJ’s negative interest rate policy.

22 November 2021

More from Marcel Thieliant

Australia & New Zealand Economics Update

RBA may make QE more flexible

We now expect the RBA to refrain from announcing a target for the overall amount of bond purchases at the July meeting while keeping the weekly pace of purchases unchanged at $5bn. A more flexible approach to bond-buying would make it easier for the Bank to end QE by mid-2022 as we anticipate.

8 June 2021

Australia & New Zealand Economics Weekly

Solid Q1 GDP more than makes up for Q2 weakness

The strong rise in GDP in Q1 has prompted us to revise up our GDP forecasts for this year. And while the Victoria lockdown will weigh on consumption growth in Q2, sentiment is holding up so we expect consumption to rebound in Q3 once the lockdown is lifted. Finally, soaring demand for housing is driving record capacity constraints in the construction industry. With the border likely to remain closed until the middle of next year, construction firms will find it difficult to alleviate the labour shortages they are facing.

4 June 2021

Japan Economics Weekly

Industry to benefit from recovery in capital spending

The slump in retail sales in April suggests that consumer spending may have fallen further during the third state of emergency. However, the medical situation is improving and the vaccination rollout is accelerating. And Japan’s traditional growth engine, its large manufacturing sector, is roaring back to life as industrial output is now above pre-virus levels. While GDP growth this year will fall short of expectations, we think it will be stronger than most anticipate in 2022.

4 June 2021
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