Economies after COVID: one year on

It is a year since we published our “Economies after COVID” series, so now seems like a good time to pause and take stock of how our predictions about the legacy of the pandemic are shaping up. There is a still a long way to go until the pandemic’s full effects can be judged, not least because the pandemic is not even over yet; only a few countries are at the point of transitioning to treating COVID-19 as an endemic disease. But, so far, it is looking like we were right to judge that the legacy of the pandemic would be found in broader issues like consumer behaviour and globalisation, rather than narrow measures of GDP.
Vicky Redwood Senior Economic Adviser
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