Moroccan car sector to drive recovery this year

Morocco’s economy has slowed over the past few years, but we think that a recovery will take hold in 2020. Further out, we expect that the country will record growth in excess of 5% a year by 2030.
James Swanston Middle East and North Africa Economist
Continue reading

More from Middle East

Middle East Economics Weekly

SPR release, Turkey exposure, Egypt price adjustments

The US-led release of oil reserves earlier this week did little to bring down the price of oil as President Biden would have hoped and, if anything, could provoke OPEC+ to raise oil production more slowly than its current plans imply. Even so, the move is unlikely to drastically alter the outlook for the Gulf economies. Meanwhile, the spillovers from Turkey’s currency crisis are likely to be contained, although Tunisia's poor external position leave it vulnerable to financial contagion. Finally, Egypt’s government has announced it will cut electricity tariffs which could pose a threat to the fiscal position further down the line.

25 November 2021

Middle East Economics Update

Tunisia’s fragile external position poses risk to dinar

Tunisia’s external position is in a dire state and policymakers have little ammunition available to defend the dinar. We think the currency will depreciate by more than 10% against the euro by the end of next year and the risks lie heavily to the downside.

25 November 2021

Middle East Economics Weekly

Tunisia fiscal policy, Egypt’s private sector, COVID-19

Tunisia’s government upwardly revised its 2021 budget deficit target this week which, coupled with growing signs of it making concessions to appease the UGTT labour union, adds to our view that the public finances will continue to deteriorate and a debt restructuring will be needed. Elsewhere, Egypt government announced plans to scale back its involvement in the economy. While encouraging, there are reasons to be sceptical. And finally, COVID-19 vaccine rollouts in parts of North Africa have picked up the pace and the news of the development of an antiviral pill will provide countries with a further tool to add to the arsenal.

18 November 2021

More from James Swanston

Middle East Economics Focus

Egyptian pound’s rally to go into reverse

The Egyptian pound has appreciated significantly since the devaluation in 2016 and there are signs that the strength of the currency is weighing on the country’s external competitiveness. We forecast a gradual depreciation from around 15.6/$ now to 17/$ by the end of next year, which is a larger fall than most expect. But there is a risk that policymakers have not learnt from their past mistakes and support an overvalued exchange rate for too long, leading to a sharper adjustment further down the line.

15 June 2021

Middle East Data Response

Saudi Arabia Consumer Prices (May)

The rise in Saudi inflation to 5.7% y/y in May is likely to be followed by another increase in June, but the headline rate will fall sharply in July to around 1.0-1.5% y/y as the effects of last year’s VAT hike fade. Inflation will probably remain subdued over the rest of this year and through 2022-23.

15 June 2021

Middle East Economics Weekly

Egypt vaccine, MENA tourism, Iran nuclear talks

Egypt’s domestic vaccine production has got underway, but the country has a very long way to go before it can lift virus-related restrictions on a sustained basis. Egypt and Bahrain were added to the UK’s travel red list, adding to our view that recoveries in tourism sectors in the region will be sluggish. Finally, recent comments from US Secretary of State Antony Blinken have reduced hopes that Iran’s nuclear deal can be revived soon.

10 June 2021
↑ Back to top