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Brazil IPCA (Apr. 2022)

The jump in Brazilian inflation to 12.1% y/y in April was driven by a broad based increase in price pressures and supports our view that the central bank’s tightening cycle has further to run. We still expect an additional 75bp of hikes in the Selic rate (to 13.50%) over the coming months – markets have shifted this way over the past week. EM Drop-In (17th May): Do current EM debt strains point to a repeat of the kinds of crises seen in the 1980s and 1990s? Join our special briefing on EM sovereign debt risk on Tuesday. Register now.
William Jackson Chief Emerging Markets Economist
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More from Latin America

Latin America Economics Weekly

Petro reaction, Lula’s plans, hawkish central banks

Gustavo Petro’s win in Colombia’s presidential election has caused tremors in the country’s financial markets. While the appointment of a centrist finance minister could help to settle investors’ nerves, the global backdrop is turning increasingly unfavourable. In Brazil, Lula, the front-runner in the race for the presidency, unveiled policy plans that will, likewise, probably unnerve investors around the election there in October. Finally, the week was marked by further hawkish noises from central banks in the region. We’ve revised up our interest rate profile in Brazil and the upside risks to our interest rate forecast in Mexico are growing.

24 June 2022

Latin America Economics Update

Banxico’s tightening cycle shifts up a gear

The Mexican central bank’s shift to a 75bp interest rate hike yesterday (to 7.75%) and the hawkish language in the accompanying statement make another 75bp move at the next meeting in August a done deal. And the risks to our end-2022 interest rate forecast of 9.50%, which is already higher than most expect, are now skewed to the upside.

24 June 2022

Latin America Economics Update

Copom: revisiting the 2015-16 playbook

The latest Brazilian central bank communications give a strong signal that, when Copom stops hiking interest rates, it will act in a similar way to the end of the last tightening cycle in 2015. The lesson from that period is that rates will be kept high for a long time and, when an easing cycle begins, it will start very slowly. As a result, we have pushed some of the interest rate cuts in our profile from 2023 to 2024. We now expect the Selic rate to end next year at 11.00% (our previous forecast was 8.50%) and are sticking to our end-24 forecast of 7.50% (versus a current Selic rate of 13.25%).

23 June 2022

More from William Jackson

Africa Economics Update

A primer on South Africa’s monetary policy reform

The South African Reserve Bank is set to shake up its monetary policy setup. This Update provides some clarity on what policymakers will do and why, and what it means for monetary and credit conditions. China Drop-In (12th May, 09:00 BST/16:00 SGT): Join our China and Markets economists for a 20-minute discussion about near to long-term economic challenges, from zero-COVID disruptions to US-China decoupling. Register now.

11 May 2022

Latin America Economics Weekly

Inflation alarm bells, Amlo seeks price freeze

The rise in inflation to multi-decade highs across much of the region in April is clearly worrying policymakers and, this week, Mexico’s government became the latest to announce measures to cushion the blow to consumers. Mexico’s plan should help to reduce inflation a little, but it will incur a fiscal cost and faces major implementation challenges. In the meantime, the latest inflation developments and comments from central banks support our view that interest rates across the region will be hiked further than most currently expect. China Drop-In (12th May, 09:00 BST/16:00 SGT): Join our China and Markets economists for a 20-minute discussion about near to long-term economic challenges, from zero-COVID disruptions to US-China decoupling. Register now.

6 May 2022

Emerging Markets Economics Update

What a strong dollar means for EMs

While a stronger dollar is generally regarded as a headwind for EMs, we think it will only be a minor one for most major EMs, particularly compared with the headwinds from weakness in China, spillovers from the war in Ukraine, and domestic monetary tightening. The strong dollar is a much greater challenge for EMs with large foreign currency debts though, including Sri Lanka, Ghana and Turkey. China Drop-In (12th May, 09:00 BST/16:00 SGT): Join our China and Markets economists for a 20-minute discussion about near to long-term economic challenges, from zero-COVID disruptions to US-China decoupling. Register now.

6 May 2022
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