Recovery in world trade continues, for now

April’s data revealed that world trade flows have enjoyed virtually interrupted growth for 12 months now, with world trade remaining well above its pre-virus level. But between the quintupling of shipping costs over the past year, supply disruptions, and a potential cooldown in the demand for traded goods as economies re-open, there is no shortage of impediments to a continued robust recovery.
Simon MacAdam Senior Global Economist
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