Europe

UK

Industrial leads yield-driven recovery in values

The recovery in UK commercial property continued into August, despite a backdrop of more equivocal economic data. But, while the economic softness should be short-lived and returns for 2021 are likely to remain healthy, we suspect that the real estate recovery will struggle to maintain its current pace. The upturn so far largely reflects a yield-driven boost from the industrial sector, which we think will temper next year, while any revival in office and retail sectors remains hamstrung by structural concerns.

24 September 2021

Why we changed our mind on the BoE

There were two key reasons behind our decision to forecast that the Bank of England will first raise interest rates in 2022 rather than in 2023. First, there is more evidence that the rise in inflation is feeding into faster underlying wage growth and higher inflation expectations. Second, the Bank’s reaction function appears to have changed as it seems less willing to look through a temporary rise in inflation. That said, we still think that the Bank will raise interest rates a little later than the February 2022 date priced into the market and to a lower level by the end of 2024 than investors expect.

24 September 2021

Limited risks to DM property from Evergrande

The Evergrande crisis has made waves in financial markets this week. But, while the developed property markets we cover may see some short-term upheaval, we think the impacts outside of China are unlikely to be severe or lasting. In view of the wider interest, we are also sending this UK Commercial Property Update to clients of our Commercial Property and Housing Services.

23 September 2021
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MPC getting closer to tightening policy

While rates were left at +0.10% in an 9-0 vote and the Bank of England’s target stock of purchased assets at £895bn, today’s Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) policy statement suggests that the Bank is moving closer to raising interest rates. As such, we now think that rates could rise in early 2022, rather than in 2023 as we had previously thought.

IHS Markit/CIPS Flash PMIs (Sep.)

The small fall in the composite activity PMI in September indicates that the economy lost a little more momentum. But at the same time, there were clear signs that price pressures have continued to pick up. While it is difficult to know which the Bank of England will choose to put more weight on, our view is that the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) won’t rush to raise interest rates.

23 September 2021

Will a transition to net-zero cause higher inflation?

A gradual transition to ‘net-zero’ emissions would have a modest impact on inflation but could still make life more difficult for central banks if it happened at a time when other pressures were building.

Prices to continue rising as stamp duty holiday elapses

There is no doubt that demand cooled after the stamp duty discount was reduced. But a collapse in new listings has eclipsed the decline in new buyer demand, suggesting that prices will at least hold their ground in Q4 when stamp duty returns to normal. Moreover, with elevated household saving still supporting deposits, mortgage rates falling as competition between banks intensifies, and many households reassessing their homes in light of remote working we suspect demand will continue to surprise to the upside. Indeed, web search activity increased in September suggesting that the inevitable dip in transactions in Q4 will be short-lived. As a result, we expect house prices to rise by 10% y/y in Q4 2021 and by 5% in Q4 2022, above the consensus of 6% and 3.5% respectively.

21 September 2021

Worrying more about higher inflation

The recent rises in 2-year and 10-year gilt yields to their highest levels since the “dash for cash” at the start of the pandemic have entirely been driven by the investors revising up their expectations for inflation. Indeed, 10-year break-even inflation rates are now at their highest level since the Global Financial Crisis (GFC). Our forecast that RPI inflation will shoot up from 3.8% in August to just over 6.0% by the end of the year suggests that break-even inflation rates may yet rise further. But they should then drop back next year as the bulk of the rise in RPI inflation is reversed. What’s more, our view that the Bank of England will put more weight on the recent weakening in activity than the rise in inflation and won’t raise Bank Rate until 2023 suggests that a big surge in nominal gilt yields is not around the corner.

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