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Emerging Europe

Lithuania

Recession risks take centre stage

The Russian economy will collapse this year and we expect spillovers from the war in Ukraine to cause a recession in many of the smaller countries in the region, particularly Bulgaria and the Baltic States. Loose fiscal policy and strong labour market dynamics should help Poland and Hungary outperform but, even so, we’re more downbeat on GDP growth in all major economies than the consensus. We think inflation will end the year stronger and interest rates higher than most expect. The economic backdrop of widening macro imbalances, the euro-zone recession risk and aggressive global monetary tightening will cause the region’s currencies to depreciate.

20 April 2022

Russia entering recession, slowdowns in CEE

The war in Ukraine has devasted its economy, while Western sanctions are likely to push Russia into a deep contraction, with GDP set to fall by 12% this year. Immediate fears of a Russian sovereign default have not materialised and Russia’s financial markets have rebounded in recent weeks, but it’s unclear for how long this will continue. A more sustained recovery will probably require a peace deal which still looks far away. Meanwhile, spillovers from the war will be felt acutely in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE). Industry will be hit by supply disruptions and higher inflation will weigh on households’ real incomes and dampen consumer spending. We expect the war to shave 1.0-1.5%-pts off growth in CEE this year.

30 March 2022

Emerging Europe: War reinforces weak values outlook

The war in Ukraine will have spillover effects for property in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE), albeit that Russia will be far worst hit. Economic growth is expected to be slower, which will weigh on property demand, while inflation and interest rates will rise faster. We still think that office and retail rents in the CEE region can return to growth this year, but the recovery is likely to be slower than previously expected. With bond yields already higher, we think that there is less scope for further falls in property yields this year and that they will rise more quickly from next year than we previously forecast. Overall, this reinforces what was already a weak outlook for property values.

30 March 2022
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Mounting headwinds to take the shine off the recovery

We expect regional GDP growth to come in below expectations this year as high inflation erodes households’ real incomes and policy becomes more restrictive. Despite this view on the growth outlook, we think that persistent capacity constraints will mean that inflation ultimately settles at a higher level than is currently appreciated. This feeds into our relatively hawkish interest rate forecasts, particularly in Russia, Poland and Czechia.

Baltic States brush off pandemic’s economic hit

GDP in the Baltic States has already surpassed pre-pandemic levels and we expect this strength to be sustained, with growth outpacing Central Europe and the euro-zone as a whole over the coming years. This strong recovery will use up spare capacity fairly quickly and fuel higher inflation. The main risk is that these economies overheat, causing macro imbalances to build.

Inflation pressures mount as activity rebounds

Recoveries across Emerging Europe accelerated in Q2 as the easing of virus restrictions pushed GDP to, or above, pre-pandemic levels in most countries and we think this momentum will continue in Q3. However, the recovery has been accompanied by a marked increase in price pressures. Consumer and producer price inflation reached multi-year highs in July and shows no sign of letting up. We think inflation will fall only slightly in Russia and Turkey by year-end and will rise further above central banks’ targets in most of Central Europe. Interest rates are likely to be raised further in Russia, Ukraine, Czechia and Hungary and the risks are skewed to tightening cycles starting earlier than we currently expect in Poland and Romania.

Strong recovery, but inflation a lasting concern

Rapid recoveries are underway across the region and GDP should return close to its pre-pandemic path sooner than in most other EM regions. While the spread of highly transmissible virus strains poses the greatest threat to the near-term outlook, high vaccine coverage means that we do not think it will derail the recovery. The economic rebound is likely to use up spare capacity quickly and keep inflation pressures stronger than in other parts of the EM world. Further interest rate hikes lie in store in Russia, Czechia and Hungary in the coming months, with Poland set to join next year.

Recovery takes hold and inflation pressures build

Economic activity across Emerging Europe is rebounding strongly now that virus waves have passed and restrictions have been lifted. The recovery in Q2 looks to have been strongest in Russia, Israel and Central Europe, but we think Turkey will also join in the regional recovery in Q3. Inflation has picked up across the region and price pressures are likely to remain strong in the coming months, keeping central banks in Russia, Hungary, and Czechia in tightening mode. But we don’t think there will be appetite for rate hikes in Poland until next year and we expect Turkey’s central bank to start an easing cycle in the coming months (lira permitting).

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