The Long Run

Long Run Update

The implications of accelerated renewable electricity use

Accelerated adoption of renewable electricity will cause demand and prices of coal and natural gas to fall over the long run. While we think the global economy will handle this transition well, there will be some winners and losers depending on which commodities countries import or export.

15 October 2021

Global Economics Update

Economies after COVID: one year on

It is a year since we published our “Economies after COVID” series, so now seems like a good time to pause and take stock of how our predictions about the legacy of the pandemic are shaping up. There is a still a long way to go until the pandemic’s full effects can be judged, not least because the pandemic is not even over yet; only a few countries are at the point of transitioning to treating COVID-19 as an endemic disease. But, so far, it is looking like we were right to judge that the legacy of the pandemic would be found in broader issues like consumer behaviour and globalisation, rather than narrow measures of GDP.

8 October 2021

Emerging Markets Economics Update

China’s long-term property decline: the fallout for EMs

Irrespective of how the current problems in China’s property sector are resolved, property construction there is entering a period of structural decline. Among other EMs, the main effects will be felt in metals producers in Latin America and Africa, adding to reasons to expect weak long-term growth in countries such as Brazil and South Africa. In view of the wider interest, we have made this Emerging Markets Update available to clients of our Long Run Service

7 October 2021

Our view

We do not expect the pandemic to do permanent damage to global economic growth as vaccines allow activity to resume. There will be sustained behavioural changes, but these need not be negative. Note, for example, that technology use has accelerated in many advanced economies, supporting our view that future productivity growth will be stronger than most expect. Another key legacy will be higher public debt, but we expect this to be managed through sustained low interest rates and by central banks tolerating a significant rise in inflation. The increased pushback against globalisation has strengthened our conviction that EM catch-up will slow. Meanwhile, the green energy intensive fiscal stimulus around the world has brought forward the likely timing of peak oil demand, which will weigh on oil prices and see some EMs struggling to diversify.