Global Economics

Global Economics Update

Global Economics Update

Has the pandemic permanently reduced the workforce?

The pandemic is still depressing the size of the labour force in many developed countries. This probably reflects a mixture of temporary and permanent factors, so some of it may yet be reversed. But even if the bulk of the reduction in the labour force persists, this does not alter the big picture that the overall lasting damage to economies’ supply capacity has been limited considering the scale of the downturn.

19 October 2021

Global Economics Update

Indeed Job Postings point to shortages intensifying

We think that Indeed job data are useful and timely indicators of labour demand, and we will continue to monitor them in the months ahead. The latest data support the view that labour shortages are rising, and are most acute in the US, Australia, and Canada.

18 October 2021

Global Economics Update

Economies after COVID: one year on

It is a year since we published our “Economies after COVID” series, so now seems like a good time to pause and take stock of how our predictions about the legacy of the pandemic are shaping up. There is a still a long way to go until the pandemic’s full effects can be judged, not least because the pandemic is not even over yet; only a few countries are at the point of transitioning to treating COVID-19 as an endemic disease. But, so far, it is looking like we were right to judge that the legacy of the pandemic would be found in broader issues like consumer behaviour and globalisation, rather than narrow measures of GDP.

8 October 2021
More Publications

Global Economics Update

PMIs: More signs of supply crimping industrial recovery

The key message from today’s batch of PMIs for September is that supply constraints are still limiting growth in industry, and there is little to suggest they will ease materially any time soon. So, manufacturers and wholesalers will continue to face higher costs, raising the chances of inflation staying higher for longer.

1 October 2021

Global Economics Update

Is the rise in house prices becoming a concern?

It is an under-statement to say that house prices have weathered the pandemic well; housing markets are positively booming. Yet the drivers of this rise in prices are rather different to those of the pre-2007 housing boom, meaning that we do not seem to be heading for a repeat of the housing-driven financial crisis of 2007/08. Nonetheless, there are pockets of concern, and we would get more worried if it looked like interest rates were about to rise sharply.

Global Economics Update

PMIs show growth easing and inflation pressures rising

The flash PMIs for September show that the pace of growth slowed across developed economies towards the end of Q3, suggesting that the boost to activity from reopening is fading. But inflationary pressures show no signs of abating, with indicators of firms’ price pressures increasing again in September.

Global Economics Update

Thinking through how we could be wrong on Evergrande

If, contrary to our opinion and the consensus, a collapse of Evergrande ends up having a significant impact on the rest of the world, it will be because it first causes either major financial dislocation within China or a property-led slump in China’s economy. The latter is probably the bigger risk for the global recovery. In view of the wider interest, we are also sending this Global Economics Update to clients of our Emerging Markets Service.

Drop-In: Evergrande – What are the risks to China and the world? Chief Asia Economist Mark Williams and Senior China Economist Julian Evans-Pritchard will be joined by Senior Markets Economist Oliver Jones to take your questions about the Evergrande situation. They’ll be covering the implications of collapse for China’s financial system and growth outlook, and assessing the global markets fallout. Register here for the 0900 BST/1600 HKT session on Thursday, 23rd September.

Global Economics Update

Surge in gas prices adds to near term price pressure

In this Update, we answer six key questions about the surge in natural gas prices. The key point is that it will keep inflation in DMs and many EMs above central bank targets for a few months longer than we had previously assumed. Governments are already preparing to limit the economic damage and central banks are likely to look through this temporary spike in inflation. But this comes at a time when a host of shortages are already pushing up prices and adds to the upside risks to our inflation and interest rate forecasts.

21 September 2021
1 to 8 of 411 publications
See More ↓